About

I’m an avid reader of everything from the classics to the trivial. If you read something and enjoy it, then it’s worth reading no matter what others say. I’m currently in my second year of a Masters of Children’s Literature in Dublin, Ireland. I currently find picture books and young adult fiction appealing. Please feel free to comment, I’d love to hear your view.

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19 thoughts on “About

    • It studies everything basically since Children’s Lit began in 17th century all the way up to present.I really enjoyed the visual narrative studies on picturebooks/ graphic novels and young adult studies. Looking at the classics like the ‘Secret Garden’ ‘Alice in Wonderland’ etc was brilliant as well. I’d highly recommend it!

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  1. I just finished my BA in English Lit so I am a super Lit nerd as well. I took ONE Children’s Lit course while I was studying abroad in Australia and absolutely LOVED it. There was nothing like that offered at my university in America. I just really loved reading all of the books and trying to see what the underlying messages were that were getting pushed out towards young people. Aaaand, would the young people even understand that these were the messages that were being taught to them? Or would they simply read the texts purely for story and fun plot purposes only? Or would they subconsciously internalize those messages without even knowing it?! All things I really enjoyed thinking about and discussing. Maybe I will have to do my masters in a similar area.

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    • I think you would enjoy it, you seem to have a good grasp of it from the module you did. The problem with Children’s Literature is it is definitely the most didactic genre. The vast majority of the books are trying to teach a moral or lesson. I find this frustrating at times because some of them are way too didactic, there’s no leeway for other possible interpretations. Thanks for checking out the blog!

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      • Exactly! People can’t just write a story for children to enjoy and laugh at, it has to have a dang moral, always! This gets into tricky areas because obviously not everyone teaches their kids the same set of morals so parents often get super hyper-critical of every piece of literature that gets near their kid in fear that it will teach them some wrong lesson!

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  2. One of my chief pleasures is reading aloud to my children. I have had to have more just to keep this going. I love your blog and the diverse books you review. I shall hunt down some of the wordless picture books for myself.

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  3. Great blog! I’ve enjoyed reading your reviews, particularly on the wordless picture books this last month. I’ve recently launched a storytelling app that uses wordless picture books you may be interested in. It’s called Imagistory which you can find here if you like https://itunes.apple.com/au/app/imagistory-creative-storytelling/id562786443?mt=8

    I would love to get your feedback on our wordless stories, if you’re interested let me know and I can send them to you.

    Regards,
    Nick

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  4. Hello. I want to ask if you could recommend good fiction books for English learners? I’m writing a post about encouraging reading to improve English proficiency. I tried to ask my best friend Google but it’s hard to find a proper list (e.g. suggested books & reasons for picking them). I would really appreciate it if you could send me a link or suggest say 5 books. Thanks.

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